Vampires, etc.Award Winning TitlesGritty/UrbanHot Off the Presses-New TitlesClassics, Old and NewTear JerkersRomanceSci Fi/FantasyGraphic NovelsThrillersBooks for the BrosLOLApocalyticQuick Book TalksCamden County Teen ReadsHolocaust
ScienceArtMathLiteratureHistoryForeign LanguageSAT PrepPsychologyBusinessHealthFilm
BRAINSTORMING TOPICSTHE RESEARCH QUESTIONLOCATING INFOOUTLININGSUMMARIZING OR PARAPHRASINGEVALUATING WEBSITESANNOTATING-BIBLIOGRAPHYWRITING A BOOK REVIEW
This is the "WRITING LAB" page of the "Cherry Hill High School West LIBRARY Web Page" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

Cherry Hill High School West LIBRARY Web Page   Tags: e-collection, search engines, web links  

Last Updated: May 25, 2017 URL: http://west.cherryhill.libguides.com/content.php?pid=259578 Print Guide RSS Updates

WRITING LAB Print Page
  Search: 
 

KEYWORDS AND YOUR SEARCH

Keyword Searching

 
      
     

    CREATING A RESEARCH QUESTION

      A successful research question should meet the following criteria:

    •  Begin with a general  topic. 
    • It is helpful to do some background reading.  ...begin with an encyclopedia or general reference source (print or online) on a subject
    • Look for key words, phrases, significant people, important dates, and concepts.
    • Learn enough about your subject to be able to determine what  you want to write about.
    • You will need to decide the main point of your paper or project. 
    • Your research question should not be asking for a one word answer but should require a presentation of the issues...this will help you to create an outline     

    ANNOTATING YOUR BIBLIOGRAPHY

            Click for help!

        

      SUMMARIZING VS. PARAPHRASING

                                                                        

          

        SOURCES CHECKLIST

        Resources Checklist

        Books:   Search online catalog..Browse Library Shelves & Interlibrary loan (JerseyCat searches libraries from NJ)

        Magazines/Journals:   Search On-line Databases for journals, magazines and newspapers

        Reference Books:        Encyclopedias (print and on-line) Handbooks, Dictionaries, (REF)

        Interviews and Oral History:     are considered primary sources

        Museums: Most museums have a web page and libraries

        Experts, Associations and E-mail

        Librarians, Research Specialists and Teachers

        Primary Source : letters, autobiographies, etc.

        Internet: Search using one of the many search engines

            
           

          EVALUATING RESOURCES

                     Evaluating WEBSITES

                        

            

            AVOIDING PLAGIARISM

            Plagiarism is a serious issue. It can ruin your academic career or cause you to lose your job. You can plagiarize even without coping word for word!

            Plagiarism is:

            • Using someone else's words as your own.
            • Using some else's ideas as your own.
            • Not giving credit to whoever came up with the idea or words. (Also known as not citing your sources.)
            • Very important to avoid no matter what the source of your information.
            • Cheating, whether it's intentional or not!

            How to avoid plagiarizing:

            • Take notes on your reading. Be sure to paraphrase or summarize; never copy word for word unless you plan to use quotes.
            • Never copy and paste from an online source into your document, unless you are using quotes and citing the author.
            • Even when paraphrasing, you should cite the source of an idea unless it is common knowledge. You will know an idea is commen knowledge if you can find it in at least three sources.
            • No more than 10% of your paper should be directly quoted.
            • When taking notes, keep track of your sources so you will remember them when you start writing.
            • If you aren't sure, cite the source!

            It is important to remember:

            • Plagiarism destroys your academic integrity.
            • You learn nothing by copying or claiming other's work as your own.
            • You can plagiarize accidentally- this is why careful note taking is a must. (See the section on taking notes.)
            • Submitting your own work for more than one class without permission is also plagiarism.
            • Plagiarism is considered intellectual theft. You can be thrown out of college for the offense. Journalists have been fired for it.

            In summary:

            Direct quote                     → Cite

            Paraphrase or summary of ideas        → Cite                       

            Paraphrase of commonly known facts  → Don't need to cite!

            Your own ideas  → Don't need to cite!

                                                                        

            IN-TEXT CITATIONS

                                                   

                

              OUTLINING

                  
                Description

                Loading  Loading...

                Tip